Knotted Pull No. 1

knotted_pull_no1_photo

(edit 05/18/14 Added photos of pull tied in paracord to better show structure.)

 

As promised here is the instructions for creating knotted pull no.1.  This pull consists of four crown knots and one wall knot.  So it is just a simple combination of the knots that I have posted about thus far.  The only twist is that this pull utilizes four strands instead of three.  This is a nice pull for use on small drawers and cabinet doors.  The wall knot at the base of the crown knots can be installed to look like a square or a diamond by simply turning the pull during installation.

Front View

Front View

Side View

Side View

I usually use #72 tarred nylon twine when making my pulls.  It generally results in a completed pull that is the right size for small drawers and cabinet doors.  Tied in #72 twine this pull is 1″(25mm) long and 5/8″(16mm) square at the base.  Of course I encourage you to experiment with different cordage types and sizes to find what you like best.

Rear View

Rear View

knotted_pull_no_imageWhen tying this pull you should tighten each knot as you progress.  Once you have the pull completed you are ready for installation.  Simply drill a hole in your drawer front or cabinet door that will allow you to pass all four strands through.  Aim for a snug fit.  Then feed the strands through the hole from the face side to the rear.  Tightly pull each strand individually and shape the pull if necessary.  Once you are satisfied with the way it looks tie a wall knot on the interior to secure the pull in place.  Add a couple drops of CA glue to ensure that the wall knot does not loosen and trim the remains of the twine close to the wall knot.  Complete one last shaping and positioning of the pull and then add several drops of CA glue to the pull itself.  This will harden it.  Thats it.  Your done.

I have only used shellac on these knotted pulls and it work great.  Varnish is a traditional finish for knotted decoration and all that I have read indicates that tarred nylon takes a varnish well.  If you have a different finish that you normally use, or are using a different type twine, just do a few samples to test compatibility.

I hope that you find the instructions clear and easy to follow.  I also hope that you find this knotted pull useful.  I have at least two more versions of knotted pulls that I plan to post about soon.  Until then, happy tying.

Instructional Drawing:

knotted_pull_no1

Greg Merritt

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Illustrating, Knot Tying and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

If you don't comment this is just a fancy way for me to talk to myself.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s